CSAAM 2012 Tweets | 26th April

  • Protecting Children from Abuse – Message from Tulir http://wp.me/p1pP52-fJ
  • Today’s tweets are about how to handle disclosure of CSA by a child, and why your reactions are so important. #CSAAM
  • The information in the following tweets has been sourced from http://bit.ly/Id17qk #CSAAM
  • Children often find it hard to talk about being sexually abused. A CSA disclosure must be dealt with properly to avoid retraumatisation.
  • How the abused child feels about her disclosure depends mainly on the reaction of the adult to whom she has reported the abuse. #CSAAM
  • Care must be taken to remain calm and to show support to the child throughout the disclosure phase. #CSAAM
  • Message from Arpan – 24 http://wp.me/p1pP52-nS
  • 3 ways CSA is disclose 1] Intentional. The child directly tells. This happens when the abuse becomes too much for the child to handle.
  • And just had to tweet this: Bill proposes life term for sexual offences against kids- http://bit.ly/JUOjEh
  • 2]Accidental. An adult observes physical or behavioral symptoms that point out to the possibility of CSA e.g., pregnancy or STDs.
  • 3] Purposeful Accident. The child, confides to a to a friend, and the friend tells someone else until an adult is informed about it.
  • Children who are sexually abused are often threatened by their perpetrators to keep the abuse a secret. #CSAAM
  • Parents can have the tendency to want to lessen their child’s painful feelings by minimizing the seriousness of the situation or event.
  • Telling an adult takes a lot of courage. Children have to grapple with a lot of issues, including the fear that no one would believe them.
  • The following guidelines will help lessen the risk of causing more trauma to the child during the disclosure phase. #CSAAM
  • CSA children need to have acceptance of their feelings. Acknowledging a child’s pain shows acceptance & validates that you are listening!
  • It is important that parents don’t treat the child differently. This may give the child validity in thinking they are different & damaged.
  • Believe the child. Do not express disbelief about the child’s story. #CSAAM
  • Abusers usually tell children that nobody will believe them when they tell. #CSAAM
  • When a child is told that a trusted adult believes them, they would be encouraged to express her feelings.
  • Be calm. An adult’s expression of strong emotion will make the child blame herself for causing such feelings. #CSAAM
  • The child may be convinced that it would be better to keep the abuse to themself rather than to hurt the people around them. #CSAAM
  • Being reassured that it was not her fault would ease the child’s feelings of guilt and shame. #CSAAM
  • Talk to the child in a safe and private place. Avoid talking to the child in a place where there is no privacy. #CSAAM
  • Aside from the possibility of being interrupted, there is also the risk of being overheard by people who may not be sensitive. #CSAAM
  • A video – Psychologist Speak – Building bonds with your child http://wp.me/p1pP52-lD
  • Assure the child that the abuse is not her fault. Abusers often tell their victims that it was their fault that the abuse happened. #CSAAM
  • CSA In The News – April 26 http://wp.me/p1pP52-o6
  • Do not give promises or false hopes. Avoid telling the child that everything will be okay, or promise that you would not tell anybody.
  • An abused child’s trust has been broken already & they need an adult who could help them regain their trust in other people. #CSAAM
  • If its April, it must be Child Sexual Abuse Awareness Month! by kbpm http://wp.me/p1pP52-lP
  • It would help to say that what they disclosed would have to be reported, but only to people who could ensure their safety. #CSAAM
  • If the child reports of CSA by the father, brother, or anyone in the family, sometimes the child’s mother would not believe them. #CSAAM
  • A child’s disclosure is the first step in the long journey towards justice, and having a supportive adult would help facilitate recovery.
  • The following tweets have been sourced from http://parentsupportforchildsexualabuse.com
  • Parents must exercise extreme caution so as not to make false promises. This often occurs in cases of disputed incest and custody cases.
  • Denial- It is a normal reaction for any parent to have denial. Over time denial usually gives way to the next stage of grief.
  • This anger could be directed towards the perpetrator, the child or the parent (self blame for not being more diligent or watchful). #CSAAM
  • Anger- Once parental acceptance of at least some of the facts suurounding the sexual abuse has begun, anger will follow.
  • Parents move from anger to a bargaining stage. Parents now accept that the abuse happened but begin to struggle with the impact of the CSA
  • Depression or Sadness- Both are normal responses. Parents in this stage acknowledge that recovery could be a long term process. #CSAAM
  • Acceptance- Parents who enter this stage are accepting of the facts & the impact of the CSA. Recovery & healing are no longer feared.
  • A child must be told how sorry a parent feels that this happened. They need to know how proud their parents are for their courage to tell.
  • It must be stated that the perpetrator had NO right to touch them in that way & that the child is NOT to blame for anything that happened.
  • Children need to be reassured that they are safe and that the perpetrator can no longer abuse them. #CSAAM