CSAAM 2012 Tweets | 27th April

  • Child Pornography – Message from Tulir http://wp.me/p1pP52-fM
  • Child sexual abuse remains a taboo topic in our society; something that is not discussed openly.
  • The following tweets have been sourced from http://www.workingwaterfront.com.
  • People find it safer to assume that CSA is a rare occurrence happening in another family, to another child, or in a different community.
  • A child’s disclosure is the first step in the long journey towards justice, and having a supportive adult would help facilitate recovery.
  • Children are often sexually assaulted by someone they know and trust — 93 percent of juvenile sexual assault victims know the offender
  • The following tweets have been sourced from http://parentsupportforchildsexualabuse.com
  • Parents must exercise extreme caution so as not to make false promises. This often occurs in cases of disputed incest and custody cases.
  • Denial- It is a normal reaction for any parent to have denial. Over time denial usually gives way to the next stage of grief.
  • This anger could be directed towards the perpetrator, the child or the parent (self blame for not being more diligent or watchful). #CSAAM
  • Anger- Once parental acceptance of at least some of the facts suurounding the sexual abuse has begun, anger will follow.
  • Parents move from anger to a bargaining stage. Parents now accept that the abuse happened but begin to struggle with the impact of the CSA
  • Depression or Sadness- Both are normal responses. Parents in this stage acknowledge that recovery could be a long term process. #CSAAM
  • @CSAawareness share your stories and views about Child Sexual Abuse by participating in the Live Twitter Chat at 3.30 today @InorbitMall
  • 59 percent of them are acquaintances of the offender, and 34.2 percent are victimized by family members. #CSAAM
  • Children in Cyber World by Cybermum India http://wp.me/p1pP52-ns
  • Message from Arpan – 25 http://wp.me/p1pP52-nU
  • This is one of the factors that make CSA so uncomfortable a topic, it is not a stranger who is doing this, but people the child know.
  • The following tweets have been sourced from http://www.stopitnow.org.
  • An abused child’s trust has been broken already & they need an adult who could help them regain their trust in other people. #CSAAM
  • Do not give promises or false hopes. Avoid telling the child that everything will be okay, or promise that you would not tell anybody.
  • Assure the child that the abuse is not her fault. Abusers often tell their victims that it was their fault that the abuse happened. #CSAAM
  • Talk to the child in a safe and private place. Avoid talking to the child in a place where there is no privacy. #CSAAM
  • There are many reasons why it’s difficult to speak about CSA, especially as it affects our own lives or the lives of those we care about.
  • In most societies child sexual abuse is a taboo topic, making it difficult for most people to talk about it openly.
  • Many people think that unless they can prove abuse, they don’t have the right to speak up about behaviors or observations that concern them.
  • Obstacles include being afraid to accuse someone & being unwilling to accept that someone we care about is being abused or is abusing
  • Historically, the sexual abuse of children was addressed reluctantly due to it being viewed as a disturbing taboo topic.
  • In recent years the mental health profession has developed an understanding of the concern necessary when dealing with child sexual abuse.
  • When dealing with a topic as fragile as sexual abuse, constant discussion is key to break the silence surrounding it.
  • The following tweets have been sourced from http://www.secasa.com.au
  • In the past two decades the truth about CSA has been spoken over and over. Finally, the magnitude of this problem is being recognised.
  • Sexual abuse, and sexual abuse by women until recently, has been treated as a taboo subject.
  • A video – Psychologist Speak – How should you deal with CSA as a parent ? http://wp.me/p1pP52-lF
  • Women in society are the carers and protectors. To accept that some women also abuse sexually is therefore difficult. #CSAAM
  • However, as long as we treat it as a taboo topic, the myths persist, children continue to be sexually abused – one generation after another.
  • Part of the reason we hold to the notion that CSA is removed from our direct experience is that most children have a hard time telling.
  • In order to prevent abuse, each of us has to be willing to have uncomfortable conversations about it. #CSAAM
  • Ask school and organizational administrators what policies they have in place to protect children from CSA and request written copies.
  • Be uncomfortable talking about child sexual abuse. But, talk about it anyway.
  • CSA Survivor Story – 6 http://wp.me/p1pP52-gN
  • CSA In the News | 27th April http://wp.me/p1pP52-oc
  • The following tweets have been sourced from http://www.parenthood.com
  • A generation ago, parents denied that CSA occurred; they were unable to believe that a trusted adult would be capable of hurting their kids.
  • Saying it like it is by Chandni Parekh http://wp.me/p1pP52-mE
  • Abuse allegations were discussed in hushed voices, with a sense of humiliation. #CSAAM
  • The social taboos about discussing sex with parents or informed adults only further complicate the matter.
  • Because CSA is still a taboo topic, many people have a limited understanding of it, and believe in many myths like the stranger-molester.
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